peter k.jpg

PIONEERS IN THE APPALOOSA BREED

John Taylor visiting his ranch horse, stallion Ben Buzz. John Taylor, Wolf Point, Montana, rancher, is one of the real pioneers in the Appaloosa industry.

With a dream of the Appaloosa as a recognized breed for a goal, and his own experience with horses for a guideline, Taylor bred the colorful horses for many years before the Appaloosa Club was formed… The U.S. Army bears a large share of the blame for the degradation of the Appaloosa following the defeat of Chief Joseph's Nez Perce tribe.


In Taylor's youth the Army was once again at war, this time with the Hun, and again the Appaloosa breed was to suffer. Horses to pull artillery and supply wagons were a very marketable product and work horses bred to Indian saddle horses produced a very satisfactory animal for this purpose.


Of course, not all the spotted horses were bred to Percherons. Many saddle animals were still needed so Taylor began breaking and training them, under the tutelage of his brother Neil, older by ten years.

They found that the Appaloosas were different in more than color. The horses with the gaudy coats, white eyes and mottled skin were smarter and tougher. To the Taylor boys they were as different from other horses as mules were from horses.

To keep the weanling (Peter K -refer to photo) company Taylor bought 16 Thoroughbred mares. "Peter K. [as he was named) was the best horse I ever had," says Taylor. "He was the toughest and the fastest, and he sired good doing horses. He really put me in the Appaloosa business."

In 1949, the first crop of real good Appaloosa horses was on the ground at Taylor's ranch near Wolf Point.

John Taylor was finally in the Appaloosa business, ten years before it became a popular trend. He had been trying to interest others in the versatile animals many years before anyone gave any thought to creating the Appaloosa Horse Club.

Peter K. F-1054 added the refinement Taylor had been seeking. The trim sorrel horse didn't need the Thoroughbred mares to contribute speed to his get. This horse was a favorite at the Montana tracks. …two of the best horses to ever wear spots under their saddles—Joker B. and Apache 730.

 Joker B. was not the Montana cowboy's kind of horse.

"I lean toward the middle-of-the road Appaloosa; the Colida-bred horses are a real favorite," Taylor says. The heavy-muscled Quarter type horse is disliked by this man who makes no compromises in his horsemanship. "I didn't like to ride that type horse when I was a young man, riding 30 miles looking for the work stock before breakfast. They'd soon tear you up."


Taylor stands the leopard Ben Buzz, one of the sons of Ben Lowe, a horse that Taylor saw at the Nationals in Sacramento, and considered by the rancher to be the most strikingly attractive horse to appear on the show circuit. This leopard line reflects its Marshall Peavy and Coke Roberds breeding. Buzz is a perfect example of Appaloosa disposition and the many leopard colts running in Taylor's herd attest to the color potential of the horse.


The Ulrich Bloodlines

Don Ulrich bought leopard bred mares from the Timberline Ranch in Broadview, MT and the very last Navajos Candy colt, and he named him Ulrich Many Coups. Don's famous advertising jingles were "Appaloosa to Appaloosa, and the best to the best."  However he realized to continue with the Leopard legacy he needed to expand and enlarge the leopard gene pool dynasty by bringing in other famous leopard lines. Don visited Taylor from Wolf Point, MT and bought Rakush, Ben Buzz and a Ben Lowe leopard mare. 

He also bought from Lee Warne's ranch in South Dakota, Sully's Butterfly which is the Sundance 500 line. These new leopard blood lines plus the Timberline leopard lines, the Morgan leopard, the Simcoe Sarcee, and of course the Navajo Candy line, and a few other not well known leopard lines which all made up his breeding program.

 

NEZ PERCE & THE APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB USA

https://www.history.com/news/horses-plains-indians-native-americans
Photo Claude Thompson (photo) helped establish the Appaloosa Horse Club in 1938
https://www.history.com/news/horses-plains-indians-native-americans
Photo Claude Thompson (photo) helped establish the Appaloosa Horse Club in 1938

By 1700, horses had reached the Nez Perce and Blackfoot of the far Northwest, and traveled eastward to the Lakota, Crow and Cheyenne of the northern Plains. As horses arrived from the west, the first guns were being traded from the east. By the time of the French and Indian War in the 1760s, the armed and mounted Indian warrior was a formidable presence on the Great Plains.

 “There were about a dozen very prominent horse tribes that went all the way from the Canadian border to Mexican border …”

Following the Nez Perce War of 1877, the Appaloosa became a relatively obscure breed. In January 1937, however, the Western Horseman magazine published the first of several articles on the Appaloosa horse written by Francis Haines. These articles sparked the interest of Appaloosa owners from all around the country. Realizing the importance of preserving and improving the spotted horse breed, Claude Thompson, a long-time Appaloosa breeder, along with the help of a small group of dedicated horsemen, established the Appaloosa Horse Club in 1938.

In 1947 George Hatley was appointed executive secretary of the ApHC and the club’s records, contained in a shoe box, were moved from Moro,Oregon to the Hatley’s house in Moscow, Idaho. At this time there were 200 registered horses and 100 members. Over the next two decades the ApHC grew by leaps and bounds, necessitating four moves to larger quarters; the Club finally occupied its present building in 1974. George Hatley continued to lead the ApHC for 31 years until his retirement in 1978. At this point, over 300,000 Appaloosas had been registered and the ApHC was the third largest registry among light horse breeds.

Presently, the ApHC is an international breed registry with more than 635,000 Appaloosas’ records and 33,000 members. Today Appaloosas are used in nearly every equine discipline, including racing, jumping, dressage, reining roping gaming, pleasure and endurance. Outside the competitive arena Appaloosas are used as working ranch horses, trail horses, lesson horses and as safe and reliable family horses. The ApHC is dedicated to developing and providing programs and services to support Appaloosas and Appaloosa advocates through both competitive and non-competitive events.

http://www.appaloosamuseum.com/history-of-the-appaloosa

THE STUD AT LIPIZZANO by Johann Georg Hamilton.This group of brood mares, painted in 1727, shows the great number of coat colors prevalent amoung the original Lippizaner stock–palomino, tobiano, and a well marked blanketed Appaloosa. Courtesy of Colonel Alois Podhajsky, Commandant, Spanische Reitschule, Vienna, Austria.

Through the centuries spotted horses have been given names ranging from the mystical Celestial Horses in China, to the Knabstrupper in Denmark, to the Tigre in France.

 
Claude Thompson.jpg

NEZ PERCE &
THE APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB USA

 
The Stud At Lipizzano by Johann Georg Hamilton.jpg

THE STUD AT LIPIZZANO by Johann Georg Hamilton

The name Appaloosa joins in this history around the late 1800s. It was during this time that the term Appaloosa was first used to describe the spotted horses of the Palouse region. The Palouse, or Palouse Country, is the area of Washington and Idaho drained by the Palouse River. Early white settlers referred to the spotted horse of the area as a Palouse horse. Over time the a and Palouse were slurred together to first form the name Apalousey and later Appaloosa. The word Palouse most probably has its origin in the Sehaptin language spoken by the Nez Perce and Palouse Indians. It means “something sticking down in the water” in reference to a large rock at the confluence of the Snake and Palouse Rivers where the main village of the Palouse or Palus Indians was built. (1)

Nez Perce Acquire Horses

In the West, the Shoshones from southern Idaho were the most important distributor of horses. Because of the fine range in their territory, their herds increased rapidly. Tribes to the north, including the Nez Perce, acquired horses from the Shoshones both through trade or stealing and by 1750 all had been supplied.

The land occupied by the Nez Perce was even better-suited to raising horses than that of the Shoshones, and was better protected from enemy raids. The Nez Perce became excellent horsemen and, unlike other tribes, they practiced selective breeding of their horses by gelding the inferior stallions and trading off the poorer stock. As a result, the Nez Perce were able to produce better horses than other tribes. The Nez Perce horse herds multiplied into the thousands and in an economy where horses equaled wealth, the Nez Perce became known as an affluent tribe. Meriwether Lewis, who happened to be a skilled horseman, wrote of the Nez Perce horses in his journal, “Their horses appear to be of an excellent race; they are elegantly formed, active and durable; in short many of them look like fine English coarsers [ sic ] and would make a figure in any country.”

http://www.appaloosamuseum.com/history-of-the-appaloosa 

https://www.appaloosa.com/

 

APPALOOSA HISTORY

https://appaloosaterritory.com/Articles/tenwhoshaped.html

This article was published in the Horse Lover's Magazine November-December 1969:12, 57-58

Appaloosa History: Ten Who Shaped A Breed
Old Painter, Old Tony, Toby I, El Morrocco, Dark Cloud, Patchy, Sundance, Apache, Tip and Mansfield's Comanche.
“Certain stallions have contributed a wealth of blood and heritage to the modern day Appaloosa. There have been many greats among the spotted stallions foaled during the past half century, but a few stand out among the rest. These are truly the foundation sires of the breed in which no definite foundation sires have been named.”

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[1]

OLD PAINTER (FOALED APPROXIMATELY 1924).  CLAUDE J THOMPSON OF MORO, OREGON, WAS THE FOUNDER AND FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB. HE BASED HIS OWN APPALOOSA BREEDING PROGRAM ON THE BLOOD OF A STALLION CALLED OLD PAINTER.

[2]

OLD TONY

MORE HORSES IN THE CALIFORNIA APPALOOSA POPULATION TRACE BACK TO OLD TONY THAN TO ANY OTHER FOUNDATION HORSE.

[3]

TOBY I (FOALED 1939) [1936-1966])

                BRED BY GUY LAMB. TOBY I WAS HIGH POINT PERFORMANCE HORSE AT THE FIRST NATIONAL APPALOOSA SHOW HELD IN LEWISTON, IDAHO IN 1948. ONE OF THE BEST ORGANIZED OF THE BREEDERS ORGANIZATIONS IS TOBY BREEDERS.

Patchy.jpg

[4]

EL MORROCCO F-18 (FOALED 1935)

                ONE OF THE FIRST HORSES IN THE REGISTRY AND ONE OF ITS MOST PROLIFIC SIRES. OWNED BY SPILLER HE SIRED OVER 100 FOALS IN A THREE YEAR PERIOD. SPILLER LATER SOLD HIM TO WESTERN FILM STAR GENE AUTRY, WHO USED HIM IN FILMS AND AS A PERSONAL APPEARANCE MOUNT.

[5]

DARK CLOUD F-330 (FOALED 1944)

                OKLAHOMA PRODUCED ONE OF THE PREMIER SIRES OF RANCH USING APPALOOSAS WHEN DARK CLOUD F-330 WAS FOALED. DARK CLOUD BLOOD HAS GONE TO BREEDERS NATIONWIDE. THEY ARE USED FOR JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING AND ARE ESPECIALLY COLOR PREPOTENT. DARK CLOUD BREEDERS ASSOCIATION.

[6]

PATCHY F-416 (FOALED APPROXIMATELY 1939).  

PATCHY WAS BOTH A PERFORMANCE HORSE AND AN OUTSTANDING SIRE. HOWEVER, HIS PATERNAL BREEDING IS SHROUDED IN MYSTERY. ONE VOLUME OF THE STUD BOOKS STATES THAT PATCHY WAS SIRED BY A HORSE NAMED PATCHES, BUT OTHER SOURCES CLAIM HE WAS SIRED BY SEATTLE CHIEF. PATCHY WAS GRAND CHAMPION STALLION AT THE FIRST NATIONAL APPALOOSA SHOW AND CAME BACK TO WIN HIGH POINT PERFORMANCE HORSE HONORS AT THE FIFTH ANNUAL NATIONAL. HIS MOST FAMOUS SON, PATCHY JR F-1380 (OUT OF SUNDANCE F-500 DAUGHTER, LEOPARD LADY F-167), WAS RESERVE CHAMPION STALLION AT THE SEVENTH NATIONAL IN 1954 AND CAME BACK TO WIN THE GRAND CHAMPION STALLION IN 1955. THE LIST OF SHOW AND RACE WINNING PATCHY DESCENDANTS COULD FILL A BOOK. A FEW OF THE BEST KNOWN ARE SHAVANO [F-1679], MAGIC [F-1381], KATHY [F-895], LOLO [F-462], APACHE PATCH [F-3088], TOBY PATCH [25726], (PATCHY JR'S) OO WOW EE [8227], LADYFINGER [23730], PATCHY JR'S SHAUN TONGA [19565], WARREN'S RED DOG [17253/APHCC 1222], BOXBY [?], AND PATCHY JR'S LILA GLESKA [T-2176/APHCC 404]. PATCHY WAS A STRIKING BLANKET HIPPED HORSE WHO SIRED PREDOMINATELY BLANKET AND LEOPARD PATTERNED OFFSPRING. THE VERY ACTIVE PATCHY BREEDERS.

tip Appaloosa f1486.jpg

[7]

SUNDANCE F-500 (FOALED 1933)

                BEST KNOWN, MOST PREPOTENT DESCENDANT OF THAT LEGENDARY FIGURE, THE STARBUCK LEOPARD. BEST KNOWN AMERICAN SUNDANCE BREEDERS HAVE BEEN THE ED WEBERS OF MONEY CREEK RANCH IN HOUSTON, MINNESOTA. THEY OWNED WOODROW SHEIK F-502. TWO FAMOUS RED LEOPARDS WHICH HAVE DONE MUCH TO PROMOTE THE SUNDANCE BLOODLINE ARE SUNSPOT REVEL [F-1904] AND BAMBI E [F-2497]. ANOTHER UP AND COMER IS PATCHY SUN [39620]. NEEDLESS TO SAY, THE SUNDANCE STRAIN PRODUCES FINE, FLASHY LEOPARDS. SUNDANCE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION.

[8]

APACHE F-730 (FOALED 1942)

                A PREMIER RACE HORSE, BUT A HALTER HORSE, AND A HORSE THAT COULD SHOW IN AND WIN CALF ROPINGS, TEAM ROPINGS AND CUTTING CONTESTS. HE WON IN ALL KINDS OF PLEASURE AND REINING CLASSES. TO ADD THE FINAL FROSTING, HE WAS A PROLIFIC SIRE OF HALTER AND "DOING" HORSES. APACHE WAS HIGH POINT PERFORMANCE HORSE AT THE NATIONAL APPALOOSA HORSE SHOW IN 1951. HE WAS RESERVE HIGH POINT PERFORMANCE HORSE AT THE 1949, 1950, 1952, 1954, AND 1956 NATIONALS. TO TOP IT ALL OFF, HE BROUGHT HOME THE GRAND CHAMPION STALLION AWARD FROM THE 1954 NATIONAL.

[8] TIP F-1486 (FOALED 1953)

                BIG SNOWCAP APPALOOSA WITH BLACK FOREQUARTERS AND LEGS, TIP DID AN OUTSTANDING JOB OF IMPROVING THE NORTHWESTERN AREA APPALOOSA. TIP WAS SIRED BY THE OLD CHIEF JOSEPH REX F-688 HORSE AND OUT OF THE MARE NIFTY F-1136 WHO WAS BY BUTCH AND OUT OF FERGUSON'S SNOWFALKE F-1130. WHILE TIP WASN'T OVERLY LOUD HIMSELF, HIS SIRE WAS A VERY LOUD BLUE BLANKET HORSE. TIP SEEMED TO COMBINE THE TWO COLOR PATTERNS AND HE OFTEN SIRED BLACK BLANKETED OFFSPRING. THE TIP BLANKETS HAVE BECOME FAMOUS ALL THROUGH THE NORTHWEST. HE WAS ESPECIALLY DOCILE, WELL MANNERED STALLION. HE WAS CROSSED CHIEFLY WITH MARES OF APPALOOSA AND THOROUGHBRED ANCESTRY, WHICH RESULTED IN WELL MADE FOALS WITH LOUD COAT COLOR. TIP BREEDERS.

[9]

RAINY MOON F-181 (FOALED 1933)

                RAINY MOON [F-181] WAS FOALED ON THE WIND RIVER RESERVATION IN WYOMING. HE W1 A BLUE BLANKETED HORSE, BLIND FOR MOST OF HIS LIFETIME. HE SIRED SEVERAL HORSES WHOSE OFFSPRING MADE HIM FAMOUS. YELLOWSTONE TRAVELER [F-1987], GRANITE CANYON [F-2049], RINCON BUCK [F-769], SAGE DOG [CRHA 288-R], WYOMING [CRHA 316-R] AND HUERFANO LEOPARD [F-890] WERE A FEW OF HIS SONS AND OTHER NOTABLE DESCENDANTS INCLUDED CHOYA [F-1951], DOTSMABABY [F-2414], TEJAS PUNTO [T-882 ], TOM TOM [I, F-2090], NUDO [F-3008] AND AYOKA [F-3354].

[10]

MANSFIELD'S COMANCHE [F-3096 1933-1959]

                BLANKETED HORSE WHO SPENT HIS ENTIRE LIFETIME AS A HERD SIRE ON THE JACK MANSFIELD RANCH NEAR VEGA, TEXAS, AND THROUGH THE PASSING YEARS, THIS HORSE HAS BECOME FAMOUS THROUGH THE WINNING WAYS OF HIS DESCENDANTS. A FEW OF COMANCHE'S FAMOUS SONS WERE DOUBLE SIX DOMINO [F-2646], CHEROKEE A [F-2847 ], OKLAHOMA [F-2398 ] AND SPECKLED BUTT [T-3810]. OTHER DESCENDANTS ARE BUTTONS B [F-1681 ], BEAU QUAVO [F-2769], CHERI KIOWA [T-1130], HIGH SPOT [F-3559], DUSTY TOMAHAWK [21112] AND BO BO SPOT [36707], TO NAME ONLY A FEW. MANSFIELD COMANCHE BREEDER'S ASSOCIATION.

OTHER APPALOOSA STALLIONS HAVE LEFT THEIR MARK UPON THE BREED, BUT NOT TO AS GREAT A DEGREE AS THESE TEN. STALLIONS SUCH AS BLANCO [ F-45], CHEETAH [F-125], PAL [F-201], MORGAN'S LEOPARD [F-437], FREEL'S CHICO [F-715], JOKER B [F-678], QUANAH [F-706], PAISANO [F-1023], CHIEF MALHEUR [F-1274], PETER K [F-1054], SHEIKH [F-1795], DUDE DANDY SR [F-3325], SIR OLIVER [PRE-REGISTRY] AND OTHERS WHOSE NAMES DON'T IMMEDIATELY COME TO MIND...THEY ALL DESERVE A SPECIAL HONORABLE MENTION. BUT THOSE TEN - OLD PAINTER, OLD TONY, TOBY I, EL MORROCCO, DARK CLOUD, PATCHY, SUNDANCE, APACHE, TIP AND MANSFIELD'S COMANCHE...THESE WERE THE TEN WHO SHAPED THE BREED.

TO REVIEW THE ENTIRE ARTICLE CLICK THE FOLLOWING LINK:

HTTPS://APPALOOSATERRITORY.COM/ARTICLES/TENWHOSHAPED.HTML

 
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THE "SULLY" APPALOOSAS

 

THE "SULLY" APPALOOSAS

The "SULLY" Appaloosas Started with Bambi E F-2407

Started by Lee Warne with his Sundance stallion, Bambi E F-2407.

The name "Sully" comes from where Mr Warne lived - Sully County, South Dakota. The county is named after General Alfred Sully who built Fort Sully.

​Bambi E., the stallion that shaped much of South Dakota’s Appaloosa industry, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The 1954 stallion was born in Fort Morgan, Colorado. Sired by Woodrow Sheik, a son of Appaloosa legend Sundance, and out of P.V.F.’s Butterfly, Bambi E. was taken to Iowa, where Lee Warne eventually found him as a 2 year old. Lee commented about his purchase in a February 1988 article in Appaloosa Journal. “The first time I laid eyes on ‘Bambi,’ he was not what I would call an awe-inspiring individual,” he said. “He was kind of skinny and kind of small, but there were some things that I saw in him that I really liked.”

Bambi E. was purchased in 1956 and taken to his new home in Custer, South Dakota. His leopard coloring made him the first of his kind in the state, which drew much attention to the horse. The stallion’s sudden popularity—and a surging interest in Appaloosas— prompted Lee to purchase grade mares with foundation Quarter Horse bloodlines to breed the stallion to.

 Lee bred Bambi to 10 mares in 1957, and out of that first crop came Sully B, whose maternal grandsire was said to be the foundation Quarter Horse Plaudit.

 Sully B was sold to L.F. McDonnell of Fort Worth, Texas. The stallion went on to numerous titles, including 1961 National reining horse and 1962 National junior champion cutting horse. In 1961 Lee co-founded the Center of the Nation Appaloosa regional club; it was the only year Bambi E. was shown. The stallion was named high-point performance and high-point halter stallion in South Dakota; he also won open reining classes in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, and Rapid City, South Dakota. Bambi’s show career was short, but he was quite prolific as a sire of performance and halter horses.

Lee and his children, Randy and Nancy, showed Bambi’s offspring successfully, using Sully’s Pattern, Sully’s Twinkle, Sully’s Baby Grand, Sully’s Nugget, Sullys Hummingbird and Sully’s Honeysuckle B. in various events. The “Sully” in their names comes from the county in which Warne Appaloosa Ranch resides.

https://sub.appaloosa.com/association/hof/pdfs/BambiE.pdf